Annotation Phase

The annotation phase of the project was meant to make the translation more reader-friendly. I simply took more information from the transcription phase and other sources and compiled the relevant information into notes for the book. The notes add a lot of historical content, as well as references. Since the format of my project is a children’s book, there isn’t a lot of room for interesting historical facts or even a large portion of the basic information about Franklin S. Harris’s life. Knowing I had the annotation phase as a part of this project made it easier for me to decide what to include in the translation and what to omit.

Notes

1In 1890, after two decades of fighting and avoiding US laws against polygamy, the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints issued a proclamation stating that the Church was no longer going to teach or permit polygamy in order to comply with the laws of the US. This proclamation is now published as “Declaration 1” in the Doctrine and Covenants. [“The Manifesto and the End of Plural Marriage.” The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, https://www.churchofjesuschrist.org/topics/the-manifesto-and-the-end-of-plural-marriage?lang=eng.%5D

2I decided to translate the life of Franklin S. Harris into a trilingual, illustrated children’s book because it incorporates two important parts of Frank’s life that I feel connected to: his multilingualism, and his love of art. 

3Franklin S. Harris was my great-grandfather on my father’s side (my grandfather’s grandfather). He was born on August 29, 1884 and died on April 8, 1960. [“Franklin S. Harris.” Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, 14 Nov. 2019, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Franklin_S._Harris.%5D

4Franklin and his family didn’t live in Benjamin for very long, so it was a little unusual for him to have been born there. [Jenson, Janet. The Many Lives of Franklin S. Harris. IBEX Publishers, 2003, pp. 1]

5Full name Denison Emer Harris. His middle name, Emer, came from his grandfather, who was Martin Harris’s brother. [FamilySearch, https://www.familysearch.org/tree/pedigree/landscape/KWC3-HMP.%5D

6Frank’s father and mother decided to enter into plural marriage shortly before the Manifesto [Jenson, Janet. The Many Lives of Franklin S. Harris. IBEX Publishers, 2003, pp. 1].

7The families were very equal, even to the number of children. Both wives had nine children [Jenson, Janet. The Many Lives of Franklin S. Harris. IBEX Publishers, 2003, pp. 1].

8Frank even sometimes wrote in his journal in Spanish. When he wrote in his journal about Estelle, who would later be his wife, he often wrote in Spanish. [Jenson, Janet. The Many Lives of Franklin S. Harris. IBEX Publishers, 2003, pp. 31]

9Frank was mentored while at BYU by a professor named John A. Widstoe. In fact, Frank was so beloved by his professors, he didn’t even have to take his final exams to graduate [Jenson, Janet. The Many Lives of Franklin S. Harris. IBEX Publishers, 2003, pp. 28-29].

10Frank was not a very romantic man. When he got married, all he wrote in his journal was, “Got married. Mr. and Mrs. C. had a few friends at their home.” [Jenson, Janet. The Many Lives of Franklin S. Harris. IBEX Publishers, 2003, pp. 32]

11Again, Frank didn’t seem to be very emotional when his first daughter was born. He wrote, “Preparations began for an event. Estelle sick. Up all night.” Then on 25 May, “Baby born at 11 in forenoon.” [Jenson, Janet. The Many Lives of Franklin S. Harris. IBEX Publishers, 2003, pp. 33]

12Frank was also offered a job at Cornell for a much higher salary, but he decided to return to Utah[Jenson, Janet. The Many Lives of Franklin S. Harris. IBEX Publishers, 2003, pp. 36].

13I am a descendant of Franklin S. Harris through Leah Harris Jensen

14This painting is the only one in the book inspired by a real photograph from Frank’s biography.

[Jenson, Janet. The Many Lives of Franklin S. Harris. IBEX Publishers, 2003, pp. 291]

15Frank made many changes to BYU while he was president there. One of the more interesting ones is that he announced that the book of student rules would be discarded. The only rule would be that students conduct themselves “as every honest Latter-day Saint should.” [Jenson, Janet. The Many Lives of Franklin S. Harris. IBEX Publishers, 2003, pp. 77]

16Frank was president of BYU from July 1921 to June 1945 [“Franklin S. Harris.” Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, 14 Nov. 2019, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Franklin_S._Harris.%5D

17Frank’s world travels were very important in the transition of BYU from a college to a university. When I asked my grandfather what he remembered about Frank, he said, “I think many people thought his travel was extravagant but he was trying to pull the university from a very small school to a world-class university, and he couldn’t achieve this without first-hand knowledge of what existed in the rest of the world.” [Jensen, William Dorius. “Re: Franklin S. Harris files.” Received by Lillian Jensen, 18 Oct. 2019]

18Frank and Estelle traveled all over Europe, Asia, South America, and the Middle East together. For some of these trips they had their family with them as well. As Franklin S. Harris Jr. said in his remembrances of his father, “One time at family dinner father and I were speaking of Paris with nostalgia. One of my younger sisters said that Paris was dirty, but father replied, yes, but it was romantic dirt.” [Harris, Franklin Stewart Jr. Recollections of Franklin Stewart Harris. 1980]

19This story is another memory from my grandfather. He wrote, “[Franklin S. Harris] visited us in Southern California when I was 7 or 8. We had some other cousins staying with us and we were sleeping outside. He came out to talk to us and gave us an astronomy lesson. He also told us about an event in Iran, where his Iranian guide had shown him some agricultural areas and it got dark, and they got lost. He used the stars to help guide them back to civilization. He noted the irony in the fact that he had to tell the Iranian how to get back, as the earliest astronomers were in Iran, but his guide was completely ignorant of astronomy and navigation!” [Jensen, William Dorius. “Re: Franklin S. Harris files.” Received by Lillian Jensen, 18 Oct. 2019]

20Although Frank never learned any Arabic as far as I know, because he spent time in the Middle East, I felt connected to him through my study of Arabic, and because of that connection, I decided to translate this short book into Arabic.

21This translation omits large portions of Franklin S. Harris’s life. When translating this into the new medium, I had to decide what was possible to translate into Farsi and Arabic, as well as what would be the most important parts to include in a children’s book. Because of this, I omitted much about his world travels, career at BYU, and all of his political campaigns. What remains is the information that I thought was the most accessible for children and the most important parts of his life.